Airport Business

MAY 2018

The airport professional's source for airport industry news, articles, events, and careers.

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TECHNOLOGY By Joe Petrie A Window to More Revenue DFW's experiment with dynamic glass showed it can influence travelers to spend more by creating a comfortable environment in the terminal. When Dallas Fort Worth International Airport (DFW) leaders were looking at improvements to the facilities, one thing they noticed in Terminal A was a concessions issue at one of its restaurants. The Twisted Root had issues with sun glare coming into its space, which in turn meant empty seats in the bar area when it would be bright outside. But when the airport was looking at ways to enhance sustainability inside the terminal, they found something to address both the environment and flagging sales inside the restaurant — dynamic glass. "This project gave us an opportunity to work on what we're trying to do, which is change the image of sustainable, green buildings and green initiatives that they cost additional money," said Robert Horton, vice president of environmental affairs at DFW. "We're trying to change the way that people evaluate making decisions just on short-term paybacks alone. "We wanted to use this to validate a theory that these solutions can drive economic value, can improve the experience for the passengers and have a whole host of benefits." DFW worked with View Inc. and installed dynamic glass at Twisted Root restaurant in Terminal A to test the results of how well the technology worked and how it influenced behavior. The 30-day trial in October showed an 80 percent spike in alcohol sales at the restaurant by creating a comfortable environment for patrons. "It has been known that daylight drives retail activity, but I think this is the most concrete example of that," said Brandon Tinianov, vice president of industry strategy for View Inc. "Certainly this is the first with direct correlation to dynamic glass." A TECHNOLOGY IN WAITING Dynamic glass has been used frequently for years in office buildings and education facilities, but is relatively new in the airport realm. The windows sense light and adjust tint by time of day to increase or decrease sunlight in the terminal. Tinianov said the glass can be adjusted to allowing less than 0.5 percent of total light. "In essence, it's transition lenses for your building," he said. "Unlike transition lenses, it doesn't work solely on environmental factors. It's actually controlled by an intelligent algorithm that sits on top of the system as a software interface." Installation of the glass included running wiring and low voltage connections to a power supply. A sensor was installed on the roof of the terminal to measure cloud conditions and override the sun's angle on a cloudy day to optimize conditions. Horton said DFW began exploring dynamic glass to maintain its carbon neutral status. "We wanted to use this to validate a theory that these solutions can drive economic value, can improve the experience for the passengers and have a whole host of benefits." ROBERT HORTON, VICE PRESIDENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL AFFAIRS AT DFW View Inc. 12 airportbusiness May 2018

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